coartar


coartar
v.
1 to limit, to restrict.
2 to coarct.
* * *
coartar
verbo transitivo
1 to limit, restrict
* * *
VT to limit, restrict
* * *
verbo transitivo <persona> to inhibit; <libertad/voluntad> to restrict
* * *
= anchor, restrict, tie down, cripple, frustrate, dam (up), shackle, box in, hamstring, fetter, hem + Nombre + in, chill, cramp.
Ex. One can now picture a future investigator in his laboratory, his hands are free, he is not anchored.
Ex. This is an example of a classification which is restricted to a specific physical form, as it is used to classify maps and atlases.
Ex. There are many able people still tied down with the routine 'running' of their libraries.
Ex. The objection to it seems to be that by reading rubbish children cripple their own imaginative, linguistic or moral powers.
Ex. The psychologist Abraham H Maslow has warned of 'true psychopathological effects when the cognitive needs are frustrated'.
Ex. But to prevent any meandering at all, or to dam the flow of talk too soon and too often by intruding, generally only frustrates spontaneity = Aunque evitar cualquier divagación o cortar el flujo de la conversación demasiado pronto y con demasiada frecuencia con interrupciones generalmente sólo coarta la espontaneidad.
Ex. Tom Sutherland, a professor at the American University of Beirut, was kidnapped in 1985 and held prisoner for six and a half years, for much of the time shackled to his prisoner Terry Anderson.
Ex. What is important is that agencies face few barriers to disseminating information on the Web quickly rather than being boxed in by standardization requirements = Lo que es importante es que las agencias se encuentran pocas trabas para diseminar información en la web de una forma rápida más que verse restringidas por cuestiones de normalización.
Ex. Instead, the proposed regulations would hamstring public access.
Ex. Faculty tenure is designed to allow the scholar to proceed with his investigation without being fettered with concerns arising from loss of job and salary.
Ex. The world of work is no longer constrained by the four physical dimensions of space and time that have hemmed us in for most of recorded history.
Ex. This would chill the freedom of inquiry that is central to the academic process and that is, moreover, privileged by the First Amendment.
Ex. They used schools as a buttress of a caste system designed to subordinate blacks socially, to cramp them economically under a rigid job ceiling.
----
* coartar el avance de Algo = hinder + progress.
* coartar el progreso de Algo = hinder + progress.
* * *
verbo transitivo <persona> to inhibit; <libertad/voluntad> to restrict
* * *
= anchor, restrict, tie down, cripple, frustrate, dam (up), shackle, box in, hamstring, fetter, hem + Nombre + in, chill, cramp.

Ex: One can now picture a future investigator in his laboratory, his hands are free, he is not anchored.

Ex: This is an example of a classification which is restricted to a specific physical form, as it is used to classify maps and atlases.
Ex: There are many able people still tied down with the routine 'running' of their libraries.
Ex: The objection to it seems to be that by reading rubbish children cripple their own imaginative, linguistic or moral powers.
Ex: The psychologist Abraham H Maslow has warned of 'true psychopathological effects when the cognitive needs are frustrated'.
Ex: But to prevent any meandering at all, or to dam the flow of talk too soon and too often by intruding, generally only frustrates spontaneity = Aunque evitar cualquier divagación o cortar el flujo de la conversación demasiado pronto y con demasiada frecuencia con interrupciones generalmente sólo coarta la espontaneidad.
Ex: Tom Sutherland, a professor at the American University of Beirut, was kidnapped in 1985 and held prisoner for six and a half years, for much of the time shackled to his prisoner Terry Anderson.
Ex: What is important is that agencies face few barriers to disseminating information on the Web quickly rather than being boxed in by standardization requirements = Lo que es importante es que las agencias se encuentran pocas trabas para diseminar información en la web de una forma rápida más que verse restringidas por cuestiones de normalización.
Ex: Instead, the proposed regulations would hamstring public access.
Ex: Faculty tenure is designed to allow the scholar to proceed with his investigation without being fettered with concerns arising from loss of job and salary.
Ex: The world of work is no longer constrained by the four physical dimensions of space and time that have hemmed us in for most of recorded history.
Ex: This would chill the freedom of inquiry that is central to the academic process and that is, moreover, privileged by the First Amendment.
Ex: They used schools as a buttress of a caste system designed to subordinate blacks socially, to cramp them economically under a rigid job ceiling.
* coartar el avance de Algo = hinder + progress.
* coartar el progreso de Algo = hinder + progress.

* * *
coartar [A1 ]
vt
1 ‹persona› to inhibit
su presencia lo coartaba he found her presence inhibiting, her presence inhibited him
2 ‹libertad/voluntad› to restrict
* * *

coartar (conjugate coartar) verbo transitivopersonato inhibit;
libertad/voluntadto restrict
coartar verbo transitivo to restrict
'coartar' also found in these entries:
English:
constrict
* * *
coartar vt
to limit, to restrict
* * *
coartar
v/t restrict
* * *
coartar vt
: to restrict, to limit

Spanish-English dictionary. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • coartar — verbo transitivo 1. Poner (una persona o una cosa) límites a la libertad de [una persona o un animal]: No se puede coartar el derecho a la libre circulación de las personas. Coartar la libertad de los pájaros metiéndolos en jaulas me indigna …   Diccionario Salamanca de la Lengua Española

  • coartar — Se conjuga como: amar Infinitivo: Gerundio: Participio: coartar coartando coartado     Indicativo   presente imperfecto pretérito futuro condicional yo tú él, ella, Ud. nosotros vosotros ellos, ellas, Uds. coarto coartas coarta coartamos coartáis …   Wordreference Spanish Conjugations Dictionary

  • coartar — (Del lat. coarctāre). tr. Limitar, restringir, no conceder enteramente algo. Coartar la voluntad, la jurisdicción …   Diccionario de la lengua española

  • coartar — Acto de estrechar u oprimir, especialmente la luz de un vaso sanguíneo. Diccionario Mosby Medicina, Enfermería y Ciencias de la Salud, Ediciones Hancourt, S.A. 1999 …   Diccionario médico

  • coartar — |àrt| v. tr. 1. Restringir. 2. Reduzir a limites mais estreitos. = DIMINUIR   ♦ Grafia no Brasil: coarctar …   Dicionário da Língua Portuguesa

  • coartar — (Del lat. coartare.) ► verbo transitivo 1 Estorbar o impedir la ejecución de algo: ■ no hay fuerza que coarte el proceso de degeneración física del individuo. 2 Poner límites a la libertad de acción de una persona: ■ le coartó con sus cínicas… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • coartar — {{#}}{{LM C09044}}{{〓}} {{ConjC09044}}{{\}}CONJUGACIÓN{{/}}{{SynC09266}} {{[}}coartar{{]}} ‹co·ar·tar› {{《}}▍ v.{{》}} Limitar, restringir o no conceder enteramente{{♂}}, especialmente referido a una libertad o un derecho{{♀}}: • Una sociedad… …   Diccionario de uso del español actual con sinónimos y antónimos

  • coartar — co|ar|tar Mot Agut Verb transitiu …   Diccionari Català-Català

  • coartar — transitivo coaccionar, coercer*, limitar*, restringir, cohibir, sujetar. ≠ dejar, permitir, soltar. * * * Sinónimos: ■ cohibir, coercer …   Diccionario de sinónimos y antónimos

  • coartar — Limitar, restringir …   Diccionario Castellano

  • coartación — ► sustantivo femenino 1 Acción y resultado de coartar. 2 MEDICINA Estrechez congénita o adquirida de la aorta. * * * coartación (del lat. «coarctatĭo, ōnis») 1 f. Acción de coartar. 2 Obligación de ordenarse dentro de determinado plazo para poder …   Enciclopedia Universal


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